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Kyoto’s Public Student Dorms for International Students: Pricing, Applications & Making Japanese Friends

Kyoto’s Public Student Dorms for International Students: Pricing, Applications & Making Japanese Friends

Where you live on study abroad can make a big difference. After coming home from school, it can be very reassuring to come back to friends at home, too.
To that end, Study Kyoto would like to introduce several dorms and housing facilities in Kyoto that offer just such a living situation!
It can be a truly wonderful experience to live together with international students from a variety of countries, and students from schools outside your own.
In a dorm, you can live together with Japanese students, too, so you should have opportunities to practice Japanese as well!

Dorm life fosters an international perspective:option one

To begin with, we’ll start with some of Kyoto’s public dorms!

Both of them come with many attractive features, like the ability to interact with other students, more affordable fees than living alone in an apartment, and much more!

Dorm Name: Kyoto International Student Orientation Center (Satsuki & Mizuki Dorms)
Address(es):
Satsuki Dorm: 1202 Kanbei-cho, Ogawa-dori Shimodachiuri-agaru, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto
Mizuki Dorm: 26-88 Konoe-cho, Yoshida, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto
Site: http://www.pref.kyoto.jp/kokusai/newhouse.html
Blog: https://kyotodorm.wordpress.com/

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Top 10 Questions Students Want Answered!

1. How do international students go about entering the dorm? Is there a set period for application? Many students may not speak much Japanese before entering the dorm…what kind of support is available in English?

Applications are made through the universities the students are attending. Please ask with each school for information about specific time periods for applying. After entering the dorm, students will receive support from an international student for orientation, as well as from Japanese students living in the dorm.

2. Will students be living together with Japanese students?

Several male and female students live in each dorm, respectively, as resident advisors.

3. How much does it cost? Are there other initial fees besides rent?

Rent is 33,500 yen, which includes a fee for facility upkeep, administrative fee, and internet usage fee. (Electricity in each room, bedding, laundry machine and shower usage fees, as well as fire & other insurance require separate fees.)

4. Are there any limits on the length of time one can live in the dorm?

In general, the limit is one year from your move-in date.

5. Does the dorm have any particular rules, like a curfew, dorm groups, cleaning responsibilities, etc?

There are several rules residents have to follow while they are living in the dorm.

6. Is it possible to see the dorm in advance, before moving in?

If you agree on a date in advance with the administrator, you may see the dorm in advance.

7. Are there private rooms? To what extent are the bathrooms, kitchen, etc. shared spaces?

Each room is a one-person room. Bathrooms, kitchen, and showers are shared.

8. Are meals included, and/or can residents cook their own meals?

Meals are not included, but residents may use the shared kitchen.

9. Are there any events held at the dorm?

The dorm has a welcoming party, as well as opportunities to experience Japanese culture and take part in the local community.

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10. Is there anything else students should know about the merits of living in a dorm? Please share a welcome message for international students.

We have two other dorms in Kyoto Prefecture, and there are many events for international students to join at these three dorms. These international student dorms are a great place for international students to live and learn about Japanese customs and rules during their first experience studying abroad in Japan.

 

Comments from an International Student Living in Kyoto International Student Orientation Center’s Satsuki Dorm

Name: Lucas
Country: Australia

1. How did you find out about your dorm?

It was recommended to me by a friend—there was an application form for Kyoto University dorms.

2. What was the best part of living in a dorm?

Getting to know the other students in the lounge, watching movies together, and the Halloween party we held in the dorm.

3. Was there anything you learned by living in a dorm, or a way that you felt you grew while living there?

I learned a lot about other countries by trying food from many different countries.

4. Please share a welcome message for international students who may enter the dorm in the future.

At Satsuki Dorm, there are a lot of chances to learn about Japanese life and culture, and plenty of opportunities to experience it. There will be many chances to interact and grow close not only to other international students and Japanese students, but with local Japanese people, too. There are a lot of great shops near the dorm, too, so I think it’s a really convenient and comfortable living arrangement for international students.

Dorm life fosters an international perspective:option two

Dorm Name: Kyoto International Student House
Address: 10 Shogo-in Higashi-machi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 606-8325
Site: http://hdbkyoto.jp/

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Top 10 Questions Students Want Answered!

1. How do international students go about entering the dorm? Is there a set period for application? Many students may not speak much Japanese before entering the dorm…what kind of support is available in English?

We accept new residents in Spring (February) and Summer (July). Residents are accepted to the dorm on the basis of their application papers and an interview. The dorm’s official languages are English and Japanese.

2. Will students be living together with Japanese students?

Of the 34 residents of the dorm, roughly one third (around 10 people) are Japanese. International students are accepted at a limit of three people per nationality.

3. How much does it cost? Are there other initial fees besides rent?

Rent is 30,000 yen per month, with a monthly fee of 4,600 yen for upkeep of the facilities, as well as electricity fees, which are paid by each individual, per usage in their room. New residents are also required to pay an entry deposit of 20,000 yen, and a fee of 10,000 yen to prepare the dorm for their entry.

4. Are there any limits on the length of time one can live in the dorm?

Residents may stay for more than a year, for up to two years. If residents wish to stay longer, and they pass an interview, they may extend their stay for a year.

5. Does the dorm have any particular rules, like a curfew, dorm groups, cleaning responsibilities, etc?

There is no curfew. To ensure that dorm life is smooth, we also elect students to be in charge of particular aspects of dorm upkeep (Residents are all required to fill such a post).

6. Is it possible to see the dorm in advance, before moving in?

You may see the dorm during the dorm administrator’s working hours. Reservations are required, so be sure to contact the dorm before you make your visit.

7. Are there private rooms? To what extent are the bathrooms, kitchen, etc. shared spaces?

All living rooms are private. The showers (there are no bathtubs), restrooms, kitchen, and laundry room are all shared. There are also rooms that are available for everyone to use, including a lobby, exercise space, table tennis room, billiard room, and piano room.

8. Are meals included, and/or can residents cook their own meals?

Everyday meals are not provided. (Six times a semester everyone gathers together to cook what we call a “common meal.”)

9Are there any events held at the dorm?

Official Events: Welcoming Party for New Students, Common Meal, Sports Day, Seminars, Short Trips, International Food Parties, Thanksgiving, Christmas Party, Group Cleaning
Student-Planned Events: Dance Party, Halloween Party, etc.

10. Is there anything else students should know about the merits of living in a dorm? Please share a welcome message for international students.

Kyoto International Student House was Kyoto’s first international student dorm, and was the first international student dorm in Japan to offer shared living to both Japanese and international students. The dorm’s limit of three people per nation of origin ensures an international atmosphere of various manners, customs, cultures, and religions, allowing students to experience shared living by understanding one another’s differences. “House parents” also live in the dorm together with the students, and will be there to offer advice to international students, who can begin their life in Japan with peace of mind, despite having arrived so recently.

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Comments from an International Student Living in Kyoto International Student House

Name: Akanksha Tyagi
Country: India

1. How did you find out about your dorm?

I came to know about HdB through my friend. He had lived here for some time and strongly recommended it.

2. What was the best part of living in a dorm?

In HdB, both Japanese and international students live together, so, I could learn about Japanese and other foreign cultures at the same time. I learned new languages, including Japanese, different cuisine, and local games like Catan, Go, and many more, all under one roof. Additionally, we have various partially funded activities for residents like common meals, trips, and dance parties, which help us bond and enjoy our life in Japan. Such small things make daily life in HdB full of fun.

3. Was there anything you learned by living in a dorm, or a way that you felt you grew while living there?

Living in HdB teaches you to live and enjoy your life in a diverse community. As you are surrounded by a mixed bunch of people, not necessary of your age, nationality, or educational background, you can develop a new perspective, and appreciate different opinions. Unlike the university, where you spend few hours, living together in a dormitory, like HdB, is more useful to enjoy your life in Japan and learn lots of things beyond studies.

4. Please share a welcome message for international students who may enter the dorm in the future.

HdB has a welcoming and loving environment. Here, you will never walk alone. So, if you are looking for a homely place to live, please join us and grow the HdB community.